Your FAQs represent an opportunity to break down the prospect's last points of…

Your FAQs section - that’s the place where you answer the questions most frequently asked by people considering buying your product, right?

Well, yes and no. You certainly do want to do that, but on a sales page, your FAQs section represents an opportunity to break down the prospect’s last points of resistance.

Now I’m not advocating using hundreds of words to beat the reader into submission, until they are so consumed by FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out) they feel compelled to buy your stuff. That’s just not my style.

But imagine the prospect who really would love to buy what you have to offer, and would truly benefit from doing so. What are the quiet whisperings of doubt they have that stops them hitting the ‘buy’ button?

Those whisperings are what you want to tackle in your FAQs.

But don’t forget to also include the genuinely oft asked questions (and their answers).

So here’s some suggestions of items you might want to include on your FAQs page, or in your FAQs section. Take what’s relevant to your business and dump the rest.

The Practical Stuff

Do you ship overseas?
What’s your return/refund policy?
How do I get in touch with you? And how long will it take for you to reply?
How long will it take to receive my order?
Is postage and packaging included?
I don’t see what I want listed, do you do custom orders?

Overcome Points Of Resistance

I (insert reason why I think this won’t work for me here) - will this program be right for me?
You can use multiple questions that address these concerns. For example:
I’m a vegan, will I be able to follow this meal plan?
I work full-time, will I be able to fit this program into my life?

Explain Features In More Detail

Sometimes the features you mention on your sales page, could use a little further explanation, but you don’t want to do it right there in the middle of your sales page as that will ruin the reader’s flow. So whenever you have a valuable piece of information, that doesn’t really sit in the main part of the sales page, you can save it for the FAQs.

For example:

If you offer a library of digital training materials, there are plenty of details your reader might want to know about that:
Can I access the materials offline
Am I able to download the materials
What minimum Internet speed do I need to use the library
How often are the library materials updated….and so on and on.

Restate Your Benefits - in Q&A format

This is your last hurrah before presenting the reader with the ‘buy’ button again. So make it count. Use questions to set up opportunities to communicate the key benefits to the reader. For example:
* I’ve tried meal plans before and I didn’t lose weight, how is this different?
* I’m not sure this is right for me right now, why should I buy now instead of waiting?
* If I buy, what difference will this make to me?

If you’ve got other FAQ examples you’d like included in this list, I’d love to see them. Tell me about it in the comments below.

Writing a sales page? Check out my Not So Secret Sales Page Template.


I’ve super-helpfully smooshed all my Worditude goodies into one place, so you can see all the free resources available at a glance. Go get ’em here.

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Sales Page Example FAQs

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